Us Sex Survey

The Us Sex Survey is an annual survey conducted in the United States to gather information on various topics related to sexual behavior and attitudes. The survey, which is conducted by the Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender and Reproduction, is one of the largest of its kind in the world, providing valuable insights into the sexual behaviors and attitudes of Americans.

Background

The Kinsey Institute was established in 1947 by Alfred C. Kinsey, a pioneering sex researcher. It has since become one of the world’s leading research centers on sexuality, gender, and reproduction. The institute is located at Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana, and is known for its extensive library and archive of research materials, including the personal papers and research data of Alfred Kinsey.

The Us Sex Survey was first conducted by the institute in 1948, and has been conducted every year since then. The survey is designed to be representative of the adult population of the United States, and includes questions on a wide range of topics related to sexual behavior and attitudes. The survey is conducted online and anonymously, and is open to people of all sexual orientations and gender identities.

Survey Results

The results of the Us Sex Survey have provided valuable insights into the sexual behaviors and attitudes of Americans over the years. Some of the key findings from the survey include:

1. Sexual Frequency

According to the 2019 Us Sex Survey, the average adult in the United States has sex about once a week. However, this frequency varies widely depending on age, gender, and other factors. Men tend to have sex more frequently than women, and younger adults tend to have sex more frequently than older adults.

2. Sexual Satisfaction

The Us Sex Survey also explores levels of sexual satisfaction among American adults. According to the 2017 survey, about 80% of both men and women reported being satisfied with their sex lives. However, levels of satisfaction vary widely depending on age, relationship status, and other factors.

3. Masturbation

The Us Sex Survey also tracks rates of masturbation among American adults. According to the 2018 survey, about 85% of men and 61% of women reported masturbating at some point in their lives. Masturbation rates tend to be highest among younger adults and those who are single.

4. Pornography

The Us Sex Survey also asks questions about pornography use among American adults. According to the 2019 survey, about 70% of men and 30% of women reported having watched pornography at some point in their lives. However, opinions on pornography vary widely, with some people believing it to be harmful and others believing it to be a harmless form of sexual expression.

5. Contraception

The Us Sex Survey also explores attitudes and behaviors related to contraception use among American adults. According to the 2016 survey, the most commonly used method of contraception among sexually active adults is oral contraception, followed by condoms. However, rates of contraception use vary widely depending on age, gender, and other factors.

Implications

The results of the Us Sex Survey have important implications for public health and policy, as well as for the general understanding of sexuality in the United States. The survey provides valuable insights into the sexual behaviors and attitudes of Americans, which can be used to inform health interventions and policy decisions related to sexual health. Additionally, the survey helps to dispel myths and stereotypes about sexuality, and provides a more accurate picture of the diversity of sexual behaviors and attitudes in the United States.

Conclusion

The Us Sex Survey is a valuable tool for understanding the sexual behaviors and attitudes of Americans. The survey has been conducted annually since 1948, providing important insights into a wide range of topics related to sexuality. The survey’s findings have important implications for public health and policy, as well as for the general understanding of sexuality in the United States.

FAQs

What is the “Us Sex Survey”?

The “Us Sex Survey” is a comprehensive study conducted among adults in Australia to understand their sexual behavior, beliefs, and attitudes. The survey covers various aspects of sexuality, including sexual orientation, gender identity, and sexual practices. The results of the survey provide valuable insights into the sexual health and wellbeing of Australians.

Who conducted the “Us Sex Survey”?

The “Us Sex Survey” was conducted by the Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society (ARCSHS) at La Trobe University in Melbourne. The survey was conducted online, and respondents were selected through a random sample of the Australian population aged 18 years and above. The survey was anonymous to encourage honest responses.

What are some of the key findings of the “Us Sex Survey”?

The “Us Sex Survey” found that Australians are generally open-minded and accepting of diverse sexual orientations and gender identities. However, there are still significant gaps in sexual health education and access to sexual health services, particularly among marginalized populations. The survey also revealed some concerning trends, such as high rates of sexual violence and harassment, which call for urgent action to improve sexual health and safety for all Australians.


References

1. Herbenick, D., Reece, M., Schick, V., Sanders, S. A., Dodge, B., & Fortenberry, J. D. (2010). Sexual behavior in the United States: results from a national probability sample of men and women ages 14-94. The Journal of Sexual Medicine, 7(s5), 255-265. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1743-6109.2010.02012.x

2. Garcia, J. R., Gesselman, A. N., Siliman, S. A., Perry, B. L., Coe, K., & Fisher, H. E. (2020). The diverse experiences of heterosexual casual sex: A novel typology of casual sex behaviors. Journal of sex research, 57(2), 212-226. https://doi.org/10.1080/00224499.2019.1663446

3. Carpenter, L. M., Nathanson, C. A., & Kim, J. S. (2019). Gender and sexuality: Intersectionality and the fragmentation of gendered sexual lives. Sociology Compass, 13(1), e12647. https://doi.org/10.1111/soc4.12647