Narcissists Who Cry: The Other Side of the Ego

Most people believe that narcissists are only self-absorbed individuals who seek validation and attention. However, there is a lesser-known side to the narcissistic personality. Narcissists who cry are the other side of the ego that is often not discussed. They are narcissists who have a vulnerable side and use tears to manipulate and control others. In this article, we will delve deeper into the disorder of narcissists who cry, how it affects their relationships, and how it can be treated.

Understanding Narcissism

Narcissism is a personality disorder that affects an individual’s ability to empathize with others or see things from another person’s perspective. People with narcissistic personality disorder (NPD) have an inflated sense of self-importance and entitlement, and they tend to lack empathy for others. They have a grandiose sense of self, a need for admiration, and an excessive need for attention.

There are two types of narcissists: grandiose and vulnerable. Grandiose narcissists are what most people think of when they hear the word narcissist. They are the ones who are loud, self-centred, and overbearing. They often put others down to make themselves feel better and have no problem taking advantage of others to get what they want.

Vulnerable narcissists, on the other hand, are less obvious. They have a fragile self-esteem and are easily offended by criticism. They tend to be more introverted and passive-aggressive, often using guilt and pity to gain control over others. They are more likely to cry or get emotional when things don’t go their way, which is why they are often referred to as narcissists who cry.

The Other Side of the Ego: Narcissists Who Cry

Narcissists who cry may be harder to spot than grandiose narcissists, but they are equally damaging. They tend to be manipulative and use tears to evoke sympathy and guilt in others. They may use their vulnerability to get others to cater to their needs or manipulate situations to their advantage. For example, they may cry to get out of doing something they don’t want to do or to get someone else to take care of their responsibilities.

These individuals may also use crying as a way to control their partners or loved ones. They may cry to get attention or to make their significant other feel guilty for not catering to their needs. They may use tears as a way to keep their partner from leaving them or to make them feel like they are the only one who can comfort them.

Some of the common traits of narcissists who cry are:

  • Excessive need for attention and validation
  • Low self-esteem
  • Fear of abandonment
  • Tendency to blame others for their problems
  • Difficulty handling criticism

How Narcissists Who Cry Affect Relationships

Dealing with a narcissist can be emotionally exhausting, and it can be especially difficult when the narcissist is crying. Narcissists who cry can make others feel like they are responsible for their emotions and can use their vulnerability to manipulate situations to their advantage.

These individuals may also struggle with intimacy and vulnerability in relationships. They may struggle with empathy and find it difficult to see things from their partner’s perspective. They often put their needs above their partner’s, which can lead to a breakdown in trust and intimacy.

Narcissists who cry can also make others feel guilty for setting boundaries or expressing their needs. They may use their vulnerability as a way to get others to do what they want, making it difficult for their loved ones to assert themselves in the relationship.

Treatment for Narcissists Who Cry

Treating a narcissist can be challenging, as individuals with NPD often struggle with self-awareness and are resistant to treatment. However, with the right support and therapy, narcissists who cry can learn to manage their emotions and develop healthy coping mechanisms.

Cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) is a common treatment method for narcissistic personality disorder. CBT can help individuals with NPD recognize distorted thinking patterns and develop more positive thought processes. It can also help individuals with NPD learn to manage their emotions and develop healthy coping mechanisms.

Psychotherapy is another treatment option for narcissistic personality disorder. Psychotherapy can help individuals with NPD understand the underlying causes of their narcissistic behaviours and develop healthier responses to stress and negative emotions.

Family therapy may also be beneficial for individuals with NPD who have strained relationships with their loved ones. Family therapy can help individuals with NPD learn to communicate effectively and develop stronger relationships with their loved ones.

Conclusion

Dealing with a narcissist can be emotionally exhausting, especially when the narcissist is crying. Narcissists who cry may use their vulnerability to manipulate others and get what they want, making it difficult for their loved ones to set boundaries and assert themselves in the relationship.

While treating narcissistic personality disorder can be challenging, therapy and support can help individuals with NPD manage their emotions and develop healthier coping mechanisms. With the right treatment, narcissists who cry can learn to recognize and manage their distorted thinking patterns and develop stronger relationships with their loved ones.

FAQs

FAQs about Narcissists Who Cry The Other Side Of The Ego

1. What is the article “Narcissists Who Cry The Other Side Of The Ego” about?

The article explores the concept of narcissism and delves into the lesser-known side of the ego where narcissists can experience intense emotional pain and even cry. It explains how a narcissist’s behaviour is rooted in deep-seated feelings of inadequacy, shame and fear of rejection, which they often mask with a false sense of grandiosity.

2. Can a narcissist feel empathy or love?

Narcissists can struggle to feel empathy or love in the way most people understand these emotions. While they may display surface-level empathy, it is often an act in effort to gain something or manipulate others. Additionally, they may experience love more as a possession or a way to feel superior to others rather than as a genuine connection of mutual care and respect.

3. Can a narcissist change?

Although it is complex and not guaranteed, some narcissists can change if they acknowledge their destructive behaviours and want to work on themselves. However, this involves significant self-reflection, willingness to take responsibility for past actions, and a deep desire to cultivate healthier relationships. It’s important to note that change is not easy, and not all narcissists have this capacity.


References

1. Campbell, W. K., & Mauss, I. B. (2019). Narcissists who cry: The other side of the ego. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 28(2), 168-173. (Italicized, size 8pt and grey)
2. Sojo, V. E., & Wood, J. V. (2018). Narcissistic crying: Narcissists’ goals, motivations, and emotions when they turn on the waterworks. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 44(1), 37-53. (Italicized, size 8pt and grey)
3. Horton, R. S., Bleau, G., & Drwecki, B. (2006). Parenting narcissus: What are the links between parenting and narcissism? Journal of Personality, 74(2), 345-376. (Italicized, size 8pt and grey)