Impression Management & Self Presentation (Goffman)

Impression management and self-presentation are two concepts that are closely related to each other and are important aspects of psychology. They are both based on the work of sociologist Erving Goffman and his theory of “dramaturgical analysis”. This theory suggests that people act out their lives as if they were on a stage and that they are constantly trying to control the impressions they make on others.

What is Impression Management?

Impression management is the process of controlling the impressions that others have of you. It is a conscious effort to influence how people perceive you and is often done through self-presentation. This includes the way you dress, speak, and act in order to make a good impression on those around you. It is important to note that impression management is not the same as lying or being deceptive; it is simply a way of presenting yourself in the best light.

What is Self-Presentation?

Self-presentation is the process of presenting yourself to others in a way that is favorable to you. It is the way you present yourself to the world and is closely related to impression management. Self-presentation involves presenting yourself in a way that is authentic and genuine, while also making sure that you are putting your best foot forward. It is important to remember that self-presentation does not mean being fake or trying to be someone you are not; it is simply a way to make sure that you are presenting your true self in the best possible light.

The Role of Goffman’s Dramaturgical Analysis

Goffman’s dramaturgical analysis is the basis for both impression management and self-presentation. This theory suggests that people act out their lives as if they were on a stage and that they are constantly trying to control the impressions they make on others. According to Goffman, people have different “fronts” or “faces” that they present to different people in different situations. For example, a person may have a different “face” when they are with their family compared to when they are at work.

Goffman’s theory suggests that people are constantly trying to control the impressions they make on others and that they are aware of the social norms and expectations that come with each situation. People often use impression management and self-presentation to try to conform to these norms and expectations.

The Benefits of Impression Management & Self-Presentation

Impression management and self-presentation can be beneficial in many different ways. They can help you make a good impression on those around you, which can be beneficial in many different areas of life. For example, if you are trying to get a job, making a good impression on the interviewer can be very important. Impression management and self-presentation can also help you make friends and build relationships, as they can make it easier for you to present yourself in a positive light.

The Drawbacks of Impression Management & Self-Presentation

Although impression management and self-presentation can be beneficial, there are also some potential drawbacks. For example, if you are constantly trying to make a good impression on those around you, it can be difficult to be authentic and genuine. Additionally, if you are too focused on making a good impression, it can be difficult to be open and honest with those around you.

Conclusion

Impression management and self-presentation are important aspects of psychology that are closely related to each other. They are both based on the work of sociologist Erving Goffman and his theory of “dramaturgical analysis”. This theory suggests that people act out their lives as if they were on a stage and that they are constantly trying to control the impressions they make on others.

Impression management and self-presentation can be beneficial in many different ways, but they can also have some potential drawbacks. It is important to remember that impression management and self-presentation do not mean being fake or trying to be someone you are not; they are simply a way to make sure that you are presenting your true self in the best possible light.

FAQs

What is Impression Management & Self Presentation?

Impression Management & Self Presentation (Goffman) is a psychological concept that examines how people present themselves in social situations in order to create a desired impression. It focuses on how individuals manage their interpersonal interactions in order to control the impressions that others have of them.

What is the aim of Impression Management & Self Presentation?

The aim of Impression Management & Self Presentation (Goffman) is to help individuals understand their own behaviour in social situations and how they can use it to create a desired impression. It also aims to help individuals understand the behaviour of others in order to better manage their own impressions.

What are the key concepts of Impression Management & Self Presentation?

The key concepts of Impression Management & Self Presentation (Goffman) include self-presentation strategies, impression formation, impression management tactics, and the role of context in impression formation.

What are the benefits of using Impression Management & Self Presentation?

The benefits of using Impression Management & Self Presentation (Goffman) include improved interpersonal relationships, better self-awareness, and increased confidence in social situations. It can also help individuals to better understand the behaviour of others and to better manage their own impressions.

What are the limitations of Impression Management & Self Presentation?

The limitations of Impression Management & Self Presentation (Goffman) include the fact that it is difficult to control the impressions that others have of you, as well as the potential for manipulation or exploitation of others. It is also important to remember that the impression you create may not always be accurate or representative of who you truly are.

References

Goffman, E. (1959). The presentation of self in everyday life. New York: Doubleday Anchor.

Goffman, E. (1967). Interaction ritual: Essays on face-to-face behavior. New York, NY: Anchor Books.

Goffman, E. (1974). Frame analysis: An essay on the organization of experience. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.