Anxious vs Anxiety: Understanding the Difference

Anxiety and anxiousness are two terms that are often used interchangeably, but they actually have very different meanings. It is important to understand the difference between the two in order to properly address any anxiety-related issues you may be experiencing.

What is Anxiety?

Anxiety is a mental health disorder characterized by feelings of worry, fear, and unease. Anxiety can be experienced in a variety of ways, and can range from mild to severe. It is a normal reaction to stress, and can be helpful in certain situations, such as preparing for an exam or job interview. However, when anxiety is persistent and interferes with daily life, it can become a disorder.

Common symptoms of anxiety include excessive worrying, restlessness, difficulty concentrating, difficulty sleeping, and physical symptoms such as a racing heart, sweating, and nausea. People with anxiety may also experience panic attacks, which are sudden and intense episodes of fear and panic.

What is Anxiousness?

Anxiousness is a feeling of anticipation or fear about something that is about to happen. It is a normal emotion that everyone experiences from time to time. Anxiousness is often linked to anxiety, as people with anxiety may experience anxiousness more frequently and intensely.

Anxiousness is often triggered by something that is unknown or uncertain. It can also be caused by a fear of failure or embarrassment. Anxiousness can be helpful in certain situations, as it can motivate you to take action and prepare for the future. However, if anxiousness is persistent and interferes with daily life, it can become a problem.

Common symptoms of anxiousness include restlessness, feeling on edge, difficulty concentrating, and physical symptoms such as a racing heart and sweating.

Differences Between Anxiety and Anxiousness

The main difference between anxiety and anxiousness is that anxiety is a mental health disorder, while anxiousness is an emotion. Anxiety is more severe and persistent than anxiousness, and is often accompanied by physical symptoms. Anxiousness is more fleeting and usually triggered by something that is unknown or uncertain.

Another difference is that anxiety is often caused by a combination of genetic, environmental, and psychological factors, while anxiousness is usually caused by fear of the unknown or fear of failure.

Treatment for Anxiety and Anxiousness

Treatment for anxiety and anxiousness can vary depending on the severity of the symptoms.

For mild to moderate anxiety, treatment may include lifestyle changes such as exercise, relaxation techniques, and cognitive-behavioral therapy. For more severe cases of anxiety, medication may be prescribed.

For anxiousness, treatment may include mindfulness techniques, cognitive-behavioral therapy, and lifestyle changes such as exercise and relaxation techniques. Medication may also be prescribed for more severe cases.

Conclusion

Anxiety and anxiousness are two terms that are often used interchangeably, but they actually have very different meanings. Anxiety is a mental health disorder, while anxiousness is an emotion. It is important to understand the difference between the two in order to properly address any anxiety-related issues you may be experiencing. Treatment for both anxiety and anxiousness can include lifestyle changes, relaxation techniques, cognitive-behavioral therapy, and, in some cases, medication.

FAQs

What is the difference between anxious and anxiety?

Anxious is an adjective that describes a feeling of unease or worry. Anxiety is a noun that refers to a state of intense fear or apprehension.

What are the symptoms of anxiety?

Common symptoms of anxiety include difficulty concentrating, restlessness, irritability, racing thoughts, difficulty sleeping, excessive worrying, and physical symptoms such as sweating, trembling, and muscle tension.

How can I manage my anxiety?

There are a number of strategies that can help to manage anxiety, such as relaxation techniques, physical exercise, talking to a therapist, and lifestyle changes. It is important to find the strategies that work best for you.


References

Barlow, D. H., & Craske, M. G. (2020). Mastery of your anxiety and worry. Guilford Publications.

Olatunji, B. O., & Wolitzky-Taylor, K. B. (2008). Specificity of cognitive-behavioral therapy for anxiety disorders: A meta-analytic review. Clinical Psychology Review, 28(2), 226-241.

Hofmann, S. G. (2012). An overview of and rationale for the integrative cognitive model of panic disorder. Depression and Anxiety, 29(4), 259-269.