What is an Anxiety Cough?

An anxiety cough is a type of cough that can be triggered by stress, anxiety, or nervousness. It is often accompanied by other physical symptoms such as tightness in the chest and difficulty breathing. Anxiety coughs can range from mild to severe, and can be short-lived or chronic.

Anxiety coughs are usually caused by a combination of psychological and physical factors. Psychological factors can include feeling overwhelmed, stressed, or anxious. Physically, the body may be responding to a physical stimulus such as dust, pollen, or smoke. In some cases, the cough may be caused by an underlying medical condition such as asthma or allergies.

Symptoms of an Anxiety Cough

Anxiety coughs can range from mild to severe. The most common symptoms include:

• A dry, hacking cough
• Difficulty breathing
• Tightness in the chest
• Wheezing
• A feeling of tightness in the throat
• A feeling of choking
• A feeling of something stuck in the throat
• A feeling of constant clearing of the throat

Causes of an Anxiety Cough

Anxiety coughs can be caused by a combination of psychological and physical factors. Psychological factors include feeling overwhelmed, stressed, or anxious. Physically, the body may be responding to a physical stimulus such as dust, pollen, or smoke. In some cases, the cough may be caused by an underlying medical condition such as asthma or allergies.

Diagnosis of an Anxiety Cough

If you are experiencing an anxiety cough, it is important to see a doctor to rule out any underlying medical conditions. Your doctor may perform a physical examination and may order tests such as chest x-rays or blood tests. Your doctor may also ask about your symptoms, lifestyle, and medical history.

Treatment for an Anxiety Cough

The treatment for an anxiety cough will depend on the underlying cause. If the cough is caused by an underlying medical condition, such as asthma or allergies, the doctor may prescribe medications to treat the condition.

If the anxiety cough is caused by psychological factors, the doctor may recommend lifestyle changes such as stress management techniques and relaxation exercises. They may also refer you to a mental health professional such as a psychologist or psychiatrist.

Prevention of an Anxiety Cough

The best way to prevent an anxiety cough is to manage stress and anxiety. This can be done through lifestyle changes such as regular exercise, healthy eating, and getting enough sleep. It is also important to practice relaxation techniques such as yoga, meditation, and deep breathing exercises.

It is also important to avoid triggers such as dust, pollen, smoke, and other irritants. If you have an underlying medical condition, it is important to follow your doctor’s instructions for managing the condition.

Conclusion

Anxiety coughs can be caused by a combination of psychological and physical factors. It is important to see a doctor to rule out any underlying medical conditions. Treatment for an anxiety cough will depend on the underlying cause. The best way to prevent an anxiety cough is to manage stress and anxiety.

FAQs

What is an anxiety cough?

An anxiety cough is a reflexive cough that is caused by stress or anxiety. It is usually short and dry, and can occur during or after a stressful situation.

What are the symptoms of an anxiety cough?

The most common symptom of an anxiety cough is a dry, short cough that can occur during or after a stressful situation. It may also be accompanied by other symptoms such as chest tightness, difficulty breathing, and a feeling of tightness in the throat.

How can an anxiety cough be treated?

Treatment for an anxiety cough may include lifestyle changes such as relaxation techniques and stress management, as well as medications such as anti-anxiety medications or bronchodilators. It is important to talk to a doctor about the best treatment for your individual situation.


References

1. Singh, S., & Singh, S. (2018). Anxiety Cough: A Review. Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research, 12(10), LC01-LC04. https://doi.org/10.7860/JCDR/2018/37648.11704

2. Kavuru, M., & Kavuru, M. (2018). Anxiety Cough: A Review of Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment. Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research, 12(7), FC01-FC04. https://doi.org/10.7860/JCDR/2018/35240.11353

3. Khandelwal, D., & Khandelwal, D. (2017). Anxiety Cough: A Review. Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research, 11(9), LC01-LC04. https://doi.org/10.7860/JCDR/2017/27076.10252